Wear Sunscreen!

Driving has been linked to an increased risk of skin cancer due to sun exposure through the windows, which do not filter UVA rays.
Being a truck driver, you may not realize how much sun exposure you are really getting because you are “inside”. The left side of your face and your left arm are exposed every day. Even in the winter, the sun can cause damage to your skin. A famous study released in 2012 by the New England Journal of Medicine highlighted a Chicago truck driver who had been driving for 28 years. The prolonged exposure to the left side of the man’s face caused extreme aging. This photo demonstrates the effects of sun exposure.

The harmful UV rays that cause skin damage are also the same rays that cause skin cancer. The Skin Cancer Foundation reports that one in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. Skin cancer is common in people whose jobs expose them to more sun, like truck drivers. Fortunately, skin cancer is easy to spot and highly treatable when caught early. That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t use precaution.
Here are a few things you can do to protect yourself from the sun all day while you’re in your cab:
• Wear sunscreen every day: According to the FDA, sunscreen with SPF 30 is the best option. Anything above isn’t necessary, and anything below isn’t effective enough. Reapply the sunscreen often throughout the day.
• Wear sunglasses: UV rays can damage your eyesight and may cause cancer in your eyes as well. As a driver, your eyes are one of your most important assets.
Take measures to protect your skin and eyes from the harmful UV rays you are exposed to as a professional truck driver. Not only will you be preserving your youthfulness, you will also be decreasing your risk of skin cancer.

Road Trip Games

Bringing your child on the road with you is a wonderful opportunity to spend some quality time with them. Here are some fun road trip games to keep them entertained when boredom strikes!

1. Who Are They?
As you drive by an interesting looking house, invent stories about the people who live there. What kind of things do they like to do? What do they do for work? Do they have kids? Anything you can think of! You can also do this for cars driving by. Use your imagination and get creative! Keep a journal to write down these stories. The more detailed you get, then more interesting and fun it will be.

2. No, It’s Not A ___.
One person is “it” and thinks of a word (the more common and easy to rhyme, the better) and gives the first clue. If the word was “fly” as in a housefly, he or she might say, “I’m thinking of a word that rhymes with cry, but it isn’t pie.” The other person guesses by giving clues in return, without revealing their guess word. “Is it something men wear around their neck?” The “it” person must figure out their clue and respond, “No, it is not a tie.” If the person guessing figures out the right word, they win and become the next “it” person. Or, if the person guessing stumps the “it” person with their clue, they also win and become the “it” person.

3. Definitions Game (you will need access to a dictionary or mobile device)
One person begins by finding a word in the dictionary they think nobody has heard of and they write down the definition. Then the other player(s) guess the correct definition of the word. If they get it right, they get a point! Whoever has the most points, wins!

4. Follow Along
Give your child their own atlas to follow along as you drive down the road. Show them where you are headed and how far you’ve traveled so far. Make marks on the map to show the routes and stops you take. Instead of asking “how long until we stop” or “are we there yet” they can look at the map and find out. It also makes a good souvenir of their trip on the road with you!

5. License Plate Finder
Print off the US map and color in the states for the license plates you see on the road. See if you can find all 50 states (Hawaii might be difficult but they are out there!)

6. The Alphabet Game
Print off the game sheet. Look for all the letters of the alphabet on buildings, signs, billboards, etc. Start with A and work your way down to Z. License plate letters don’t count. Whoever finds the whole alphabet, wins!

7. The Rainbow Car Game
Print off the game sheet. Each person playing the game must find one car for each color of the Rainbow, starting with Red and working in order of the Rainbow. All vehicles must be in motion. All vehicles count, including motorcycles. However, only the cab of a semi-truck counts. The vehicle must be at least 50% of the color you are calling. If you call a color out of order, you have to go back one color.

8. Road Trip Bingo
Print off the game sheet for each person. The first person to spot an item on the board gets to mark it off first. The first person to find 5 items in a row wins!

mens-health-week

Men’s Health Week, June 12-18, 2017

Learn ways to improve your health and take the first steps to making your life more safe and healthy! Support Men’s Health Awareness by wearing blue on Friday!

  1. Quit Smoking – Quitting smoking has immediate and long-term benefits. It improves your health and lowers your risk of heart disease, cancer, lung disease, and other smoking-related illnesses.
  2. Move More – Adults need at least 2½ hours of moderate-intensity aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities every week.
  3. Get Sleep – Men who get 7-8 hours of sleep a night have around 60% less risk of a fatal heart attack. Those who get less are at the greatest risk for diabetes, depression, and obesity.
  4. Stay On Top Of Your Game – See your doctor or nurse for checkups. Certain diseases and conditions may not have symptoms, so checkups help identify issues early or before they can become a problem. Pay attention to signs and symptoms such as chest pain, shortness of breath, excessive thirst, and problems with urination. If you have these or symptoms of any kind, be sure to see your doctor or nurse. Don’t wait!
  5. Eat Healthy – Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables every day. Fruits and vegetables have many vitamins and minerals that may help protect you from chronic diseases. Limit foods and drinks high in calories, sugar, salt, fat, and alcohol.

Click here to learn more about Men’s Health.

The History of the First Semi-Truck

Everyday we see many 18-wheelers used to transport goods all over the country. The trucking industry employs around 3.5 million drivers in the United States alone and operates roughly 2 million tractor-trailers. Have you ever stopped to think how it all began?

In 1896, Alexander Winton had the idea of the tractor-trailer when he needed a solution to transporting automobiles to his customers. Winton was the CEO and founder of The Winton Motor Carriage Company of Cleveland. When business started expanding to customers outside of Ohio, Winton needed a plan to deliver the vehicles without damaging them. He could drive them, but that would put wear and tear on the vehicle and his customers didn’t want that.

Unaware at the time, his problem helped the discovery of the 18-wheeler. Winton decided he would attach a trailer to the back of his truck to transport the cars to his customers. The early version of his semi-trailer was only able to transport one car at a time, but it paved the way for the semi we know today!